All about coffeeCultivation

Cultivation

Coffee is usually propagated by seeds. The traditional method of planting coffee is to put 20 seeds in each hole at the beginning of the rainy season; half are eliminated naturally. Coffee is often intercropped with food crops, such as corn, beans, or rice, during the first few years of cultivation.

The two main cultivated species of the coffee plant are Coffea canephora and Coffea Arabica. Arabica coffee (from C. Arabica) is considered more suitable for drinking than Robusta coffee (from C. canephora); Robusta tends to be bitter and have less flavor but better body than Arabica. For these reasons, about three-quarters of coffee cultivated worldwide is C. Arabica. However, C. canephora is less susceptible to disease than C. Arabica and can be cultivated in environments where C. Arabica will not thrive. Robusta coffee also contains about 40–50% more caffeine than Arabica. For this reason, it is used as an inexpensive substitute for Arabica in many commercial coffee blends. Good quality Robustas are used in some espresso blends to provide a better foam head, a full-bodied result, and to lower the ingredient cost. Other cultivated species include Coffea liberica and Coffea esliaca, believed to be indigenous to Liberia and southern Sudan, respectively. 

Most Arabica coffee beans originate from Latin America, eastern Africa, Arabia, or Asia. Robusta coffee beans are grown in western and central Africa, throughout Southeast Asia, and to some extent in Brazil. Beans from different countries or regions usually have distinctive characteristics such as flavor, aroma, body, and acidity. These taste characteristics are dependent not only on the coffee's growing region, but also on genetic subspecies (varietals) and processing. Varietals are generally known by the region in which they are grown, such as Colombian, Java or Kona.